Headshot before and after editing

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Being a photographer is not all about the photo shoot itself, there's loads of planning beforehand. Working out light and props and location. But also, there's hours of work afterwards, processing and retouching your images. I do each one myself, and sometimes this can be a painstaking process. So, I thought I would try something a little different for my email this week, and give you a bit of a peek into some of my typical post processing. 
 
I have what you would call a 'clean' editing style. There's no creative colour grading or fancy 'filters'. My philosophy is about showing the best version of YOU in the images. But that doesn't mean that I don't need to dig in to the photo and but in some real effort. Let's take a look. 


#1
The main retouching in this image was background. We the viewer to really focus on you as the subject of the image. Things like the light switch or overly dark marks distract the viewer. Also general brightening of the overall image and making sure Kat's key brand colour (the yellow) really pops. 
 
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#2 
Another example of cleaning up the background to remove distraction. Because this image is backlit, and even though I used a fill light (at the front to put more light back into Anna's face) it still needed brightening. I am very careful when shooting not to go too far with my exposure to the point that I over-expose things. I would prefer to shoot slightly under and then use editing tools to create the overall brightness that I want. You will also see some fly-away hairs have been removed and a smidge of smoothing on Anna's skin. Not a lot because she doesn't need it. Finally, this image has been cropped 4:5 ready for social media use. 

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#3
A classic example of taking an otherwise 'meh' image and turning it into great social media content. Details like the way that your hands use the reformer machine is a part of the story of One.Body Pilates. The close crop gets the viewer to focus clearly on that element of the image, strengthening that component of the story. Lines (window frames etc) are straightened, because there's nothing that will throw an image off faster than crooked lines. Finally like all my images they are brightened a touch. 

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Editing your images is the fastest way to take any photo and really elevate it. Whether it's in a pro platform like Photoshop or your favourite app take a moment to see what you can do to your photos. 
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